Tuesday, December 7, 2010

Quote Them: Liam the Cowardly Lion

"Aslan symbolises a Christ-like figure but he also symbolises for me Mohammed, Buddha and all the great spiritual leaders and prophets over the centuries. That’s who Aslan stands for as well as a mentor figure for kids – that’s what he means for me."

Liam Neeson,
man paid for his ability to be anyone but himself




PS That's like how:

- When I read H.G. Wells, I can't help but think of childhood toys. That's right, The Shape of Things To Come, symbolizes for me...Play-Dough.

- Or when I've read excerpts from Sal Alinsky's Rules for Radicals. I don't see a progressive/liberal/communist manifesto. No. I see a country cookbook with recipes for shepherd's pie and plum pudding.

- When I hear the story of Che Guevara, I think of how the man was fighting against impossible odds for the right to wear pantaloons. White, lacy ones.

- And atheist Richard Dawkins? For me, he symbolizes the Easter Bunny, the Toothfairy, Horton the Elephant, Charlie Sheen, and Theodore Huxtable.

As long as we don't let something like truth hamper us, we're so fancy free to believe anything we want. Just like taking C.S. Lewis, a devout and infamous Christian writer, and his amazing childhood story about Jesus Christ and believing it can represent the very things that are His polar opposite.

You might be interested in the reaction from C.S. Lewis' former secretary:

Walter Hooper, Lewis’s former secretary and a trustee of his estate, said the author would have been outraged.

"It is nothing whatever to do with Islam," he said. "Lewis would have simply denied that. He wrote that the 'whole Narnian story is about Christ'. Lewis could not have been clearer."

He attributed Neeson’s remarks to political correctness and a desire to be ‘very multicultural’, adding: "I don’t know Liam Neeson or what he is thinking about… but it was not Lewis’s intention."

Darn. And I really liked him.

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